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Obstetric Simulation Training Used to Reduce Maternal Morbidity

After the USA was dubbed “the most dangerous place in the developed world to give birth,” obstetric organizations are now recommending simulation training. In fact, the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology has incorporated this type of training into its certifying exam and certification maintenance programs. Simulation training has shown to improve maternal morbidity in many areas, including postpartum hemorrhage and communication among labor and delivery teams.

Can my Ultrasound Tech be Liable for my Baby’s Birth Injury?

Ultrasound is widely accepted as a revolutionary tool in prenatal care, allowing doctors to evaluate pregnancies and detect common gynecological anomalies.  Most expectant mothers will receive at least one ultrasound during their pregnancies, however variations in quality of equipment and training of the personnel performing the ultrasound can lead to errors in diagnosis and interpretation. These errors may result in a birth injury to the baby or injury to the mother if the sonographer performing the ultrasound is inadequately trained or supervised, if the images obtained lack the quality needed to accurately form a diagnosis, or if the imaging equipment is not properly maintained. Certain “best practices” and even accreditations have been established for ultrasound performance quality. Sonographers may be held liable for breaching these standards, forming the basis of a birth injury lawsuit.

If you believe that you have a birth injury claim relating to an inadequate ultrasound you had during your pregnancy, please contact us at 877-262-9767.

Delayed Pushing does not Affect Spontaneous Delivery: Study

A common practice for laboring mothers at many U.S. hospitals, delayed pushing during the second stage of labor—when the cervix is fully dilated—had been thought to reduce the risk of deliveries in which forceps were used to deliver the baby. Now, a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that delayed pushing has no effect on whether pregnant women deliver without intervention (i.e. cesarean section or via forceps or vacuum).  Conducted by doctors at six different institutions, the study randomly assigned more than 2,400 first-time mothers at 37 weeks pregnant or later to two different groups: the first group was asked to begin pushing immediately after the second stage of labor began, while the second group was asked to delay pushing for 60 minutes. The researchers found that among the two groups, the rate of spontaneous delivery did not largely differ, as the” immediate group” experienced a spontaneous delivery rate of 85.9% and the “delayed group,” 86.5%.

Also noted in the study, however, was the rate of chorioamnionitis, or inflammation (infection) of the sac surrounding the baby in the uterus, as well as the rate of postpartum hemorrhages. The immediate group experienced lower infection rates and lower hemorrhage rates compared to the delayed group.  The study was therefore stopped after 75% of the births were analyzed due to postpartum hemorrhage and chorioamnionitis concerns that the delayed pushing group may have had, and that results were unlikely to differ substantially if the full study was carried out.

New Device Aims to Assist Foot Control in People with Cerebral Palsy

New Device Aims to Assist Foot Control in People with Cerebral Palsy

Coordinating movement and posture can be difficult for those diagnosed with cerebral palsy—but researchers out of the University of Queensland’s School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences are developing a device to improve walking ability in young adults with cerebral palsy. “The ability to use the muscles which control ankle movement can be reduced by as much as 50 percent in people with cerebral palsy,” notes one of the researchers, Shari O’Brien. The device aims to improve foot control as well as quality of life in people with cerebral palsy so that they are able to walk confidentially without fear of tripping.

Research Confirms Exercise during Pregnancy is Beneficial for Mother and Baby

Research Confirms Exercise during Pregnancy is Beneficial for Mother and Baby

In early September 2017, a study carried out by Spanish researchers confirmed the benefits of physical activity for pregnant women, as well as the adoption of a healthy lifestyle. The experts stress the importance of combining aerobic and strength training for 45 to 65 minutes, three or four days a week while pregnant. The primary benefit of exercise is the prevention of excessive weight gain, which can lead to fetal macrosomia, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, caesarean section, lower back pain, pelvic pain and urinary incontinence. The study also suggests that exercise does not carry a risk for premature birth, low birth weight or fetal distress (as previously believed), provided the mother has consulted with her doctor about exercise prior to including it in her daily regimen.

Kentucky Goalkeeper with Cerebral Palsy tries out for US Paralympic Soccer Team

Kentucky Goalkeeper with Cerebral Palsy tries out for US Paralympic Soccer Team

Carter Alvey, 17, was born with cerebral palsy, a condition that affects his muscle tone and motor skills. By the age of seven, Carter had undergone two surgeries to strengthen his spine and increase flexibility in his feet.  He sleeps in leg braces at night but doesn’t let the challenges he was born with keep him from the soccer field. Last year, Carter flew to the U.S. Olympic Training Center in California to join 15 other youth players in a trial for the men’s Paralympic soccer team. While he waits to hear back from the U.S. team coaches, the high school senior is working on his application to Clemson University, home to an intramural Paralympic soccer program that serves as an unofficial farm system for the national team. It remains unclear what that next level of play will be for Carter, but the Kentucky youth believes the sky’s the limit.

What is a Brachial Plexus Birth Injury?

What is a Brachial Plexus Birth Injury?

Newborns can sustain brachial plexus injuries as a result of negligence during the labor and delivery process. A brachial plexus injury is caused by damage to the network of nerves near the neck that give rise to all the nerves of the arm. If an infant’s shoulders get wedged or stuck within the birth canal, there is an increased risk of brachial plexus palsy.

Most often, the upper nerves are injured, a condition called Erb’s palsy. Total brachial plexus birth palsy occurs when both the upper and lower nerves are damaged. The most serious brachial plexus injury, avulsion, occurs when the nerve root is torn from the spinal cord. Brachial plexus injuries can cause permanent weakness or disability.

According to the Mayo Clinic, the signs and symptoms of severe brachial plexus injuries can include:

  • Weakness or inability to use certain muscles in the hand, arm, or shoulder
  • Complete lack of movement and feeling in the arm, including the shoulder and hand
  • Severe pain

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/brachial-plexus-injury/symptoms-causes/dxc-20127374

If you believe your child suffered a brachial plexus injury due to the labor and delivery process, please contact us today at 877-262-9767.

FDA Approves Neonatal MRI System

FDA Approves Neonatal MRI System

Last month, the US FDA approved a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system for neonatal head and brain imaging. The Embrace Neonatal MRI System by Aspect Imaging has a temperature-controlled incubator that is placed directly into the MRI system. The fully enclosed unit does not require a radio frequency shielded room, which means it can be placed directly inside a NICU environment. This removes the challenges of transporting such a fragile population to MRI suites. If urgent access to the baby is needed during the imaging process, the patient can be removed from the system in less than 30 seconds.

Drugs May Reduce Need for Shunts to Treat Hydrocephalus, Yale Study Suggests

Drugs May Reduce Need for Shunts to Treat Hydrocephalus, Yale Study Suggests

Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine may have found a new way to treat hydrocephalus (a buildup of fluid on the brain) using drugs already on the market.  The current treatment requires the surgical implantation of shunts into the skull to allow movement of fluid. The study, published in the journal Nature Medicine, investigated the use of a diuretic and an inflammation-reducing sepsis drug. Researchers plan to further study their findings and conduct a small clinical trial. If successful, the ability to avoid shunts, which are susceptible to infection and must be periodically replaced, would reduce stress on patients suffering from hydrocephalus.

What Causes Erb’s Palsy?

What Causes Erb’s Palsy?

Newborns can sustain brachial plexus injuries as a result of negligence during the labor and delivery process. The brachial plexus is a network of nerves near the neck that give rise to all the nerves of the arm. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by nerve damage. Erb’s palsy is a condition caused by injury to the upper C5 and C6 nerves (nerves located in the neck). Children with Erb’s palsy have partial or full paralysis of the arm, possibly involving loss of sensation.

One or two of every 1,000 babies have this condition. It is often caused when an infant’s neck is stretched to the side during a difficult delivery.

Erb’s palsy is usually caused by:

• Long, difficult delivery;
• Delivery of a large baby (macrosomia);
• Shoulder dystocia, when a baby’s shoulder becomes lodged behind the mother’s pubic bone; or
• Breech delivery

If your child has Erb’s palsy that you believe may have been caused during the labor and delivery process, please contact us today at 877-262-9767.

The following reviews from our clients do not constitute a guarantee, warranty, or prediction regarding the outcome of another legal matter. The cases mentioned in the reviews are illustrative of some of the matters previously handled by Grant & Eisenhofer involving various areas of birth injury law. These reviews are endorsements.

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The following reviews from our clients do not constitute a guarantee, warranty, or prediction regarding the outcome of another legal matter. The cases mentioned in the reviews are illustrative of some of the matters previously handled by Grant & Eisenhofer involving various areas of birth injury law. These reviews are endorsements.

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