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Research Suggests Link between Traumatic Brain Injury and ADHD

Research Suggests Link between Traumatic Brain Injury and ADHD

A new study was recently published by researchers from Ohio and Canada in JAMA Pediatrics suggesting that children who suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) were more than 3 times as likely to develop attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than kids with other injuries. The study, published in March 2018, examined data from 187 children between the ages of three and seven who had been hospitalized overnight for a TBI (which totaled 81 children) or other orthopedic injury (the remaining 106 children). None of the children studied had been diagnosed with ADHD prior to their injuries.

The team of researchers noted that many of the children in the study developed ADHD closer to their teenage years—nearly a decade after the injuries occurred.  “I think it is crucial that we are aware of these symptoms and addressing if they require medical or behavioral treatment in order to help these children be successful in school, and this study helps raise that awareness,” lead researcher Dr. Megan Narad said.

Oregon High School Funds Infant with Cerebral Palsy

Oregon High School Funds Infant with Cerebral Palsy

A two-and-a-half-year-old boy is being sponsored by Reynolds High School’s Sparrow Club – a national student-led non-profit to improve the lives of children with serious illnesses. The boy was born with his umbilical cord wrapped around his neck, causing hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (a brain injury caused by a lack of oxygen or blood flow). At one year old, he was diagnosed with quadriplegic athetoid cerebral palsy. Because of the damage to his brain, he cannot walk, crawl, hold his head still, or speak. The Sparrow Club hopes to improve his quality of life by fundraising to contribute towards medical bills. “We want to make our community a better place by volunteering and helping people in the community who need help,” said one of the Club’s members.

5 in 1,000 English Babies Sustain Brain Injury at Birth, Study Finds

5 in 1,000 English Babies Sustain Brain Injury at Birth, Study Finds

In December 2017, researchers at Imperial College London and Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust reported that approximately 5 out of every 1,000 live births in England sustain an injury to the brain. The study assessed 3,418 births between 2010 and 2015 with conditions linked to brain injuries. The research results also suggest that the brain injury rate is nearly seven times higher among premature infants compared to full-term infants. Trauma, specifically events that deprive the brain of oxygen, before, during, or after birth may lead to long-term conditions including cerebral palsy, hearing or vision loss, and learning problems. “The next step is to use routine data to understand the long-term effects of these conditions on the children and their families,” concluded Chris Gale, the study’s lead author and clinical senior lecturer at Imperial College.

If your child is affected by cerebral palsy as a result of malpractice, call us at 877-262-9767 to discuss your situation.

Study Suggests Therapeutic Hypothermia May Decrease Disability in Newborns with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

Study Suggests Therapeutic Hypothermia May Decrease Disability in Newborns with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

A randomized clinical trial published in The Journal of the American Medical Association analyzed the therapeutic benefits of body cooling (hypothermia) after 6 hours of age in newborns with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy—a disorder caused by a brain injury. The study encompassed data from 21 U.S. Neonatal Research Network Centers and concluded that disability or death at 18 to 22 months occurred in 24.4% of newborns that underwent hypothermia—3.5% less than those in the group that did not undergo cooling. The study focused on therapeutic hypothermia applied between 6 and 24 hours after birth and the findings suggest benefits for term infants by reducing the risk of death or disability.

Preterm Birth More Likely in Baby Boys, Study Suggests

Preterm Birth More Likely in Baby Boys, Study Suggests

New research out of the University of Adelaide in Australia suggests that the sex of a baby may play a role in potentially life-threatening outcomes at birth. Data from over 574,000 births in South Australia over a 30-year period was analyzed in this study, noting that baby boys are more likely to be born preterm than girls—a leading cause of long-term neurological disabilities like cerebral palsy. Mothers who birth baby boys were also 4% more likely to suffer from gestations diabetes and 7.5% more like to be diagnosed with high blood pressure or preeclampsia, the study also indicates. Although the exact science behind why these complications are more prevalent in male pregnancies vs. female pregnancies, the researchers hope their findings will influence maternity healthcare to better serve the needs of mother and child.

Boy with Cerebral Palsy Finishes Triathlon Second Year in a Row

Boy with Cerebral Palsy Finishes Triathlon Second Year in a Row

For the second year in a row, 9-year old Bailey Matthews completed the Castle Howard Triathlon in England—7 minutes shy of his time at last year’s race. Quite a feat for the youngster, who has cerebral palsy. Bailey completed the course partly assisted by his father John and his walking frame, but when the finish line was within reach, he cast it aside and triumphantly crossed it by himself. “It’s amazing to see how many children he’s inspired and we’re so proud of the amount of people whose lives he has made a difference to,” said his mother Julie. Bailey is motivating others to “Be more Bailey” and compete in triathlons as well.

Man with Cerebral Palsy Posts Inspiring Video Blog Workouts

Man with Cerebral Palsy Posts Inspiring Video Blog Workouts

23-year old fitness fanatic Tyler Born can most often be found at the gym—lifting weights, stretching, and training with resistance bands with one goal in mind: to be able to walk without a painful limp. Tyler has cerebral palsy, a condition caused by a brain injury that affects mobility and coordination. “The hardest thing is just walking,” said Born. But when he started recording his workouts with his GoPro camera and posting them on YouTube, his progress became an inspiration for others living with cerebral palsy and other disabilities. “The biggest thing for me is I want to make a difference and help influence people,” said Born.

Attorney Lisa Weinstein Discusses Cerebral Palsy

Attorney Lisa Weinstein Discusses Cerebral Palsy

A client of mine once told me about a doctor visit she had with her young daughter, who was experiencing developmental delays and was having trouble with her fine motor skills. Her physician diagnosed her with cerebral palsy, a condition my client did not know much about. Cerebral palsy is a condition characterized by an impairment of the body’s ability to control movement and posture.  It results from the abnormal development of a child’s brain or injury during the birthing process. Click here to learn even more about cerebral palsy.

If you believe your child has cerebral palsy as a result of an injury during the birthing process, please call us at 877-262-9767 to discuss your situation. We are here to help you.

Family of Child with HIE Organizes Buggy Push Fundraiser

Family of Child with HIE Organizes Buggy Push Fundraiser

Sarah Kay’s daughter Heidi was diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, or HIE, shortly after birth, but Sarah had never heard of the disorder. HIE is caused by a brain injury resulting from lack of oxygen or blood flow to the brain, and can lead to serious complications. Now seven months old, Heidi is unable to swallow and needs a feeding tube to help her eat.

Since she was born, a charity offering services to premature and sick babies called Bliss, local to Heidi’s parents in the UK, has helped her every step of the way. Heidi’s parents wanted to bring awareness to HIE and educate other parents who similarly were blindsided by their child’s diagnosis, so they hosted a buggy push fundraising event. The push raised thousands of pounds for the cause, and will help families like Heidi’s obtain the care they need for their children with HIE. “We spent the first two months in hospital,” Sarah says, “so it’s lovely to now be home enjoying family life.”

If your child suffers from HIE as a result of the labor and delivery process, please contact us at 877-262-9767.

The following reviews from our clients do not constitute a guarantee, warranty, or prediction regarding the outcome of another legal matter. The cases mentioned in the reviews are illustrative of some of the matters previously handled by Grant & Eisenhofer involving various areas of birth injury law. These reviews are endorsements.

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The following reviews from our clients do not constitute a guarantee, warranty, or prediction regarding the outcome of another legal matter. The cases mentioned in the reviews are illustrative of some of the matters previously handled by Grant & Eisenhofer involving various areas of birth injury law. These reviews are endorsements.

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